Taiwan Takes A Kinky Cue From South Korea Tourism

Open Jaw

Taking a page from South Korea’s tourism promotion book, Taiwan is now planning to create a “Romantic Boulevard,” a sex and love-themed park spread over a 60km coastal stretch on the southern part of the island.

Highlights will include various love-themed structures and spaces including a glass church, heart-shaped arches and a “kinky” outdoor park displaying erotic sculptures of people or animals in “various lovemaking positions,” the Wall Street Journal reports.

The Telegraph reports that the 10,000 sq. metre sculpture park will be modelled on South Korea’s Jeju Loveland park, a place where “art and eroticism meet,” where visitors can “appreciate the natural beauty of sexuality” and where “the imagination can run wild.”

South Korea’s outdoor park has 140 sculptures, including figures of naked women in erotic poses. Visitors appear to like nothing more than staging posed photographs with the sculptures.

Although still in its planning stages, “Romantic Boulevard” already has a scenic area set up for wedding portraits. Officials are also hoping to open a hotel next to the park for lovers who might want to “turn their feelings into action," said Shih Chao-hui, the Deputy Director of Taiwan's Southwest Coast National Scenic Area Office.

“We want people to fall in love with Taiwan as well as fall in love while in Taiwan. We hope to appeal to visitors in all stages of love. So we even plan to have a ‘Lost Paradise’ for those who are broken-hearted,” he added.

News of the proposed theme park has been met with mixed response, with one commentator on the local tourism office's website regarding it as “leading edge and refreshing,” while others - including the central government's own tourism bureau - fear the park could give the wrong impression of the country to foreign visitors.

The bureau, however, has not entirely ruled out the idea of building the erotic theme park and has asked the Southwest Coastal National Scenic Area Offiice to supply more details about the proposed plans.

“Taiwan is a romantic place and we are always looking for creative ways to promote it,” said Chi Yi-lin, a spokesperson for the bureau.

Shih believes the new park will help boost tourism and generate interest in the area, claiming he has already received several e-mail inquiries about its opening.

“Look, we are in the business of tourism, not education or religion, so the question should be, will the park generate business opportunities and we believe the answer is yes,” he said.





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