WestJet Says LGW Will Be Its 1st Trans-Atlantic Widebody Destination

Open Jaw

WestJet is heading to London – England that is – with LGW announced as the 1st transatlantic destination from Canada for its wide-body Boeing 767-300 aircraft.

"This news marks the next phase in the international portion of our strategic plan," said Bob Cummings, WestJet Executive Vice President, Commercial. "WestJet is at the right scale to make this step in our evolution. Combined with our low-cost approach and renowned people-driven service, we have the network, brand and infrastructure to successfully enter and grow in the wide-body market. We look forward to announcing, later this summer, our entire schedule and low-fare approach for the spring of 2016."

"Well-managed and efficient airports like Gatwick are ideal for low-cost airlines like WestJet," said Chris Avery, WestJet Vice President, Network Planning, Alliances & Corporate Development. "We love Gatwick as a convenient airport with great connectivity to central London and access to other low-cost airlines flying to points in Europe and beyond. We look forward to welcoming travellers from Gatwick through our network to destinations across Canada."

Cummings says wide-body capability now allows WS to serve LGW from anywhere in Canada and brings into consideration more international destinations in the future. “The Canadian cities we will fly from will be determined over the course of this summer," Cummings said. "We will meet with airports across the country to determine the most suitable ones we believe will meet our needs and those of our guests."

WS says further announcements on schedules, pricing and launch cities will be communicated later this summer with service commencing next spring.




Alan Bowen - June 16, 2015 @ 09:06
This is an interesting move and clearly aimed at Air Transat who have had the 'low cost' UK to Canada market to themselves since the demise of Zoom. There must be a danger of a fares war if this goes ahead, and certainly in the UK market, fares have not been as firm as they should be this year except for the very, very peak season


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