Sustainable Hospitality Operator Says It’s Time To Share Knowledge

Open Jaw

Hans Pfister

The leader of a collection of Central American hotel properties with a sustainable tourism focus says he is happy to share the company’s knowledge with hospitality and tourism operators from around the world.

“We don’t see what we have done as a competitive advantage to be kept secret but rather the building of best practices to share so that more communities can benefit from tourism done right,” says Cayuga Collection President and Co-founder Hans Pfister. The company runs a collection of sustainable luxury hotels & lodges in Costa Rica and Nicaragua.

 

When the United Nations declared in December that 2017 was being designated as the  Year of International Sustainable Tourism for Development , Pfister decided it was time to invite the global hospitality industry to come and learn from the experience gained during more than 2 decades of running sustainable tourism operations. 

 

“Learning about the declaration and reading UNWTO Secretary-General, Taleb Rifai’s quote that 2017 is, ‘a unique opportunity to advance the contribution of the tourism sector to the 3 pillars of sustainability – economic, social and environmental, while raising awareness of the true dimensions of a sector which is often undervalued,’ made me the happiest man for the planet,” says Pfister.

 

Pfister actively blogs on the issue and is an advocate for thinking beyond the typical sustainable or eco-tourism box when discovering ways to use tourism for local economic development. “Respect for the environment is a critical part of our work and each of our properties maintain the highest level of environmental sustainability ratings, but that’s not the end of our sustainability work,” he says. “Our approach aims to assist the communities around us by creating educational and economic opportunities. Our guest experience is not compromised, but instead enhanced, by sustainability.”

 

Projects led or funded by the Cayuga Collection properties in communities near their properties including the building of recycling plants, funding school libraries and new curricula, helping to provide clean water and more.

 

“Of course it is not easy doing all this work but it is the right way to build tourism and I am happy to welcome anyone passionate about sharing and learning more about our brand of sustainable tourism operations to contact me directly. As tourism grows globally so do its impacts. Together the industry needs to ensure those impacts are positive,” says Pfister. 

 

You can read Pfister’s blog here





(will not be published)